Tag Archives: pollution

It’s Christmas – The Best Time To Think about Ethical Fashion

Pamela Ravasio will present a webinar that looks at clothing manufacturing and pollution and the importance of thinking and buying ethically.

The webinar will take place on Monday, December 12, 2011, 7:30 PM (GMT)

Sign up for the Webinar at 21st Century Network’s Meetup page here

Pamela is a freelance business consultant for ethical fashion SMEs, a market researcher and a journalist. Pamela is further the founder and managing editor of Shirahime (http://shirahime.com), a blog 
that focused on the topic of sustainability in fashion, and which in 2011 won the prestigious ‘Observer Ethical Award’ in the 
category ‘ethical blog’. Pamela has previously given a webinar and organised a meetup on ethical fashion.

A new investigative report from Greenpeace, entitled ‘Dirty Laundry’, profiles the problem of toxic water pollution resulting from the release of hazardous chemicals by the textile industry in China. The investigations focuses on two facilities that were found to be discharging a range of hazardous and persistent chemicals with hormone-disrupting properties. These results are indicative of a much wider problem that is posing serious and immediate threats to both our precious ecosystems and to human health.

In the follow up research commissioned by Greenpeace International (‘Dirty Laundry 2’) it is revealed that clothing and certain fabric-based shoes sold internationally by major clothing brands are manufactured using nonylphenol ethoxylates (NPEs). NPEs — which are used as surfactants in textile production. They break down to form toxic substance called nonylphenol (NP) which is a persistent chemical with hormone-disrupting properties that builds up in the food chain, and is hazardous even at very low levels.

While Greenpeace did only analyse dye houses and brands that are – in the global context – ahead of their peers, the more worrying fact is: the vast majority of clothing brands have no means of telling if and what toxic substances are used in the manufacturing of their collections. And maybe worse: for a vast range of chemicals used in textile manufacturing, the long-term impacts on human and animal health and the environment are unclear, or even unknown, till this very day.

Greenpeace is challenging industry leading brands brands and suppliers to become champions for a toxic-free future – by eliminating all releases of hazardous chemicals from their supply chains and their products. And also governments have a crucial role to play by putting suitable frameworks into place and enforcing adherence and retrospective accountability.

The webinar will take place on Monday, December 12, 2011, 7:30 PM (GMT)

Sign up for the Webinar at 21st Century Network’s Meetup page here

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About Going Green

My brother and I came to the conclusion that real estate seemed like something that both of us had a good head for, and we decided to purchase the rights to a well known real estate agency name and append it to our own. Things seemed to be looking up for us and for our company.

We went out there and invested in commercial real estate, primarily, and we also got our hands on private homes and put them for sale under our name. Our achievements mainly surrounded bringing the customers and maintaining the facilities.

All was going well until, one day, one of our tenants read up on the benefits of going green, that is, the idea of becoming more environmentally aware about one’s surroundings and promoting practices that help protect the environment.

Although my brother and I felt negatively towards the idea at first because of the fact that it seemed to be nothing more than an attempt to get us to renovate buildings into entirely new ones for no good reason, we decided to research the matter anyway.

We found out that by going green in certain areas of our work, many parts of our work will become much easier and maybe even cheaper too.

Company cars can be hybrids instead of gas guzzlers. This would save the company hundreds of dollars a year on gas as well as serve as a much more environmentally friendly car. A major point of discussion was also the benefits of solar power.

There are also other concepts like assessing the energy efficiency of a home. This is done in order to detect where energy intake could be eliminated in order to minimize the amount of energy that would be needed for every home, which would, in turn, cost us much less as the landlords.

There are many more advantages to going green that we are learning about, and we are discovering how they can help us in our business and the surrounding environment too. Take a look into it; it just might be worth your while too.

Betty Crain-Hyde is an expert environmentalist and “going green” authority. For more details regarding the benefits of “going green” by methods of solar training, LEED certification, and other methods as well, check out the Clean Edison website online. Betty is an SEO specialist working with SEO services group ClickResponse.

Global Warming vs Natural Climate Change

by Janet Corby

Do you ever feel like you know just enough about global warming to be dangerous? Let’s see if we can fill in some of the gaps with the latest info from real global warming experts.

Scientists, together with us environmentalists, are constantly warning politicians that time is running up but that doesn’t seem to bother them, especially now in times of recession. Revive economy or save the planet? Scientists and economists can agree with Buddhist monks and Christian activists that ruthless destruction of natural habitats is evil and careful preservation of birds and butterflies is good. The worldwide community of environmentalists-most of whom are not scientists-holds the moral high ground, and is guiding human societies toward a hopeful future. Scientists are human; they do not wait for proof. Many devote their professional lives to seeking evidence for hypotheses, especially well-funded hypotheses, they’ve chosen to believe.

Temperatures were high at that time due to the peculiarities of the Earth’s orbit. During the Pliocene (2-5Ma) before the Quaternary ice age began, temperatures were also significantly warmer than today. Temperatures have steadily increased at around a quarter of a degree for every 1,000 years. During the last 100 years temperatures have increased by twice that amount.

Think about what you’ve read so far. Does it reinforce what you already know about global warming causes? Or was there something completely new? What about the remaining paragraphs?

Human activities have altered the chemical composition of the atmosphere through the build-up of greenhouse gases – primarily carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide. The heat-trapping property of these gases is undisputed although uncertainties exist about exactly how earth’s climate responds to them. Humans measure warmth as temperature which is a measure of the amount of heat contained in a physical object. One can envision this concept by thinking of a pot on a stove.

Global warming is one of the most hotly debated issues today. Cars have been identified as one of the leading contributors to the escalating global warming problem. Global warming is a huge risk. We’re not just talking about retiring our winter coats in favour of lighter jackets. Global warming is one of those era-defining issues for which perception is reality. And if that perception shifts-and it could shift quickly-the economic impact on energy companies will be swift and lasting.

Global warming had changed their habitat, so to speak. Global warming, as you may already know is the process that describes the earth’s temperature rise. This rise in temperature is because of greenhouse grasses. Global warming and climate change are the biggest problem we are facing today well at least this is what scientists say. There are of course still some that do not believe in global warming and they look at it like some crazy invented thing made by Al Gore and other scientists.

So now you know a little bit about global warming causes. Even if you don’t know everything, you’ve done something worthwhile: you’ve expanded your knowledge.

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